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sweatt v painter primary sources

In 1946, Heman Marion Sweatt, a black man, applied for admission to the University of Texas Law School. In each of these cases, the goal of the NAACP defense team was to attack the "equal" standard so that the "separate" standard would in turn become susceptible. In early 1946 Heman Marion Sweatt, an African American postman, applied to the University of Texas School of Law. Missouri ex rel. CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS. Mr. Sweatt, with the help and assistance of the NAACP, brought legal action against the university. Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate. With them on the brief were Robert L. Carter, William R. Ming, Jr., James M. Nabrit and Franklin H. Williams. A short history of the case is available through the Handbook of Texas Online.. See also Oxford African American Studies Center -- At a Glance: Sweatt v.Painter (1950). Supreme Court of United States. Canada, 305 U.S. 337; Sipuel v. Oklahoma, 332 U.S. 631; Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629; McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents, 339 U.S. 637. Cite This Item. Petitioner was denied admission to the state supported University of Texas Law School, solely because he is a Negro and state law forbids the admission of … Sweatt v. Painter Through much of the 1930s and 1940s, the legal staff of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) pursued an "indirect" strategy against segregation in public education. ISBN 978-0 … 'Sweatt V. Painter': Nearly Forgotten, But Landmark Texas Integration Case : The Two-Way As the Supreme Court hears a new case involving … This “separate but equal” doctrine became the legal basis for racial segregation in schools, colleges, universities, and the wider American society. Argued April 4, 1950. Facts of the case. Their significant victories at this level included Gaines v. University of Missouri in 1938, Sipuel v. Board of Regents of University of Oklahoma in 1948, and Sweatt v. Painter in 1950. Sweatt v. Painter Trial Documents, pt 4. Heman Sweatt was a highly regarded educator, postal worker, and activist. Heman Marion Sweatt applied for admission to The University of Texas Law School in 1946, but was denied admission on the basis of race. Contributor Names ... For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources. In Brown v. Board of Education, Topeka (1954), the U.S. Supreme Court overruled the “separate but equal” doctrine that it had articulated in the late 19th century in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896). 70 years after UT’s integration, Black law students walk by his portrait in the Atrium of the law school. Decided June 5, 1950. Heman Sweatt applied to the University of Texas law school which at that time, was an all-white school. No. Javon Collins Constitutional Law I. Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629 (1950). In none of these cases was it necessary to reexamine the doctrine to grant relief to the Negro plaintiff. SWEATT v. PAINTER ET AL. Gaines v. Canada, 305 U.S. 337; Sipuel v. Oklahoma, 332 U.S. 631; Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629; McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents, 339 U.S. 637. Before Brown: Heman Marion Sweatt, Thurgood Marshall, and the Long Road to Justice. Source for information on Sweatt v. Painter: Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History dictionary. Argued April 4, 1950. Sweatt v. Painter is a landmark decision that began a robust use of the Equal Protection Clause to stop State governments from disadvantaging people based on race. Facts of Case: A. 'Equal protection of the laws is not achieved through indiscriminate imposition of inequalities.' Heman Marion Sweatt (December 11, 1912 – October 3, 1982) was an African-American civil-rights activist who confronted Jim Crow laws.He is best known for the Sweatt v.Painter lawsuit, which challenged the “separate but equal” doctrine and was one of the earliest of the events that led to the desegregation of American higher education. II. The Black Freedom Struggle website is freely available to students, educators and patrons. Sweatt vs. Painter Essays 1240 Words 5 Pages On February 26, 1946 Herman Sweatt, who had excellent academic credentials and met all standards for acceptance into the university, was denied admission into the University of Texas Law School because of his African American race. Sweatt v. Painter--archive of primary sources including trial transcript, pleadings, memos, newspaper articles, and oral histories. 1954: Brown v. Board (Kansas) Declared “separate but equal” While the Court did not expressly overrule the separate-but-equal doctrine in Plessy v. 44. The 1950 Supreme Court case Sweatt v. Painter discusses the law of segregation and inequality. This case and McLaurin v.Oklahoma State Regents, post, p. 637, present different aspects of this general question: to what extent does the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment limit the power of a state to distinguish between students of different races in professional and graduate education in a state university? In none of these cases was it necessary to reexamine the doctrine to grant relief to the Negro plaintiff. Heman Marion Sweatt is the first African American admitted to UT Law School. When Sweatt was denied admission into the university he sued. Although Sweatt already possessed both a bachelor's degree from Wiley He is most remembered for his role in the landmark lawsuit “Sweatt vs. Painter.” Heman Marion Sweatt was born on December 11, 1912 to James Leonard Sweatt and Ella Rose Perry. 44. (What happened?) Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629 (1950), was a U.S. Supreme Court case that successfully challenged the "separate but equal" doctrine of racial segregation established by the 1896 case Plessy v. Ferguson.The case was influential in the landmark case of Brown v.Board of Education four years later. This curated selection of primary sources is designed for teaching and learning about the struggles and triumphs of Black Americans. The case led to the desegregation of the University of Texas, and set a precedent allowing educational facilities to be integrated. Heman Marion Sweatt (December 11, 1912 – October 3, 1982) was an African-American civil rights activist who confronted Jim Crow laws.He is best known for the Sweatt v.Painter lawsuit, which challenged the "separate but equal" doctrine and was one of the earliest of the events that led to the desegregation of American higher education. State law restricted access to the university to whites, and Sweatt's application was automatically rejected because of his race. Scholars investigate the impact of the case on the desegregation of public schools across the nation using a short video. State law restricted access to the university to whites, and Sweatt's application was automatically rejected because of his race. Sipuel v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma (1948) Sweatt v. Painter (1950) Brown v. Board of Education (1954) For resources on these cases, you can turn to the Washburn School of Law’s Brown v. Board of Education site, Street Law’s Landmark Cases site and the Sweatt v. Painter archive at the University of Denver College of Law. 1950: Sweatt v. Painter (UT Austin) Determined that a separate law school for African Americans was not constitutional due to racial isolation and other intangibles, paving the way for Brown v. Board. Date: 1950. Klarman introduces Sweatt v. Painter (1950) as one of two cases “instrumental to desegregating higher education in the border states and the peripheral South” (253). The papers of Theophilus Shickel Painter are housed in the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History.. Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629 (1950), was a U.S. Supreme Court case that successfully challenged the "separate but equal" doctrine of racial segregation established by the 1896 case Plessy v. Ferguson.The case was influential in the landmark case of Brown v.Board of Education Heman Marion Sweatt became the first African American student to attend the University of Texas in 1950. SOURCE: For a full treatment of Sweatt v. Painter see Gary M. Lavergne. Decided June 5, 1950. Sweatt v. Painter Malcolm X stated, “Segregation is that which is forced upon an inferior by a superior. Sweatt v. Painter 1950: U.S. SUPREME COURT decision regarding the SEPARATE-BUT-EQUAL PRINCIPLE in COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATION. Syllabus. 94 L.Ed. Heman Sweatt. U.S. Reports: Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629 (1950). The Center holds additional papers relating to the case as well, indexed under "Sweatt.". No. In Sweatt v. Painter, supra, in finding that a segregated law school for Negroes could not provide them equal educational opportunities, this court relied in large part on “those qualities which are incapable of objective measurement but which make for greatness in a law school.” In McLaurin v. 339 U.S. 629. State law restricted access to the university to whites, and Sweatt’s application was automatically rejected because of his race. Developed with input from Black history scholars and advisors, its easily discoverable materials are ideal for assignments and special projects focused on U.S. Black history. The case book system is designed to cause your students to go to the primary sources of law, rather than to secondary sources of law for their information. And in Sweatt v. Painter, supra, the Court expressly reserved decision on the question whether Plessy v. 630*630 W. J. Durham and Thurgood Marshall argued the cause for petitioner. Southern Pacific Co. 1890), elimination of the all-white political primary (Smith v. Allwright 1944), desegregation of higher education (Sweatt v. Painter 1950), abortion (Roe v. Wade 1973), flag burning (Texas v. Johnson 1989), gun control (U.S. v. Lopez 1995), gay rights (Lawrence v. Texas 2003), separation of church and state (Van Orden v. What were the facts of the case? MR. CHIEF JUSTICE VINSON delivered the opinion of the Court. Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629 (1950) Sweatt v. Painter. In 1946, Heman Marion Sweatt, a black man, applied for admission to the University of Texas Law School. In 1946, Heman Marion Sweatt, a black man, applied for admission to the University of Texas Law School. SWEATT v. PAINTER, Supreme Court of the United States (1950), 339 U.S. 629 B. University of Texas Press, 2010.

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The NAACP has always been at the forefront of the fight against racial discrimination and economic inequality. Voting rights and the battles against voter suppression are just as important today as they were during the Civil Rights Movement. Health care, education, and economic opportunity need our action if they are ever to improve.

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ACT-SO Committee

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ACT-SO (Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics) honors academic and cultural achievers at the same level as sports achievers. ACT-SO members recruit 9th through 12th grade students annually for an academic competition. The NAACP believes that African-Americans can succeed and compete at the same or superior levels as their counterparts in classrooms, boardrooms and laboratories throughout the world.

Chair: Avelina Holmes

Meeting Date & Time: Varies according to ACT-SO activity schedule

actso@naacphouston.org

Armed Services & Veterans Affairs Committee

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The Armed Services and Veterans Affairs Committee focuses on Armed Services and Veterans programs at the local, state and national levels to ensure they are administered fairly for minorities. The committee studies conditions pertaining to minorities and their families and handles discrimination complaints from members of the Armed Services and Veterans.

Chair: W. Clyde Lemon

Date & Time: 1st Monday, 12:00 pm via conference call

veterans@naacphouston.org

Communications Press & Publicity Committee

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The Communications Press & Publicity Committee works to eliminate employment segregation and discrimination in the media industry. The members monitor local and national media including advertising, and promote the NAACP Houston Branch to gain favorable publicity in local newspapers, television and other media.

Chair: Linda Chandler Jacobs

Meeting Date & Time: TBD 2nd Tuesday 6:30pm @ NAACP

media@naacphouston.org

Community Coordination Committee

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The Committee on Community Coordination enlists the support of other community organizations on issues affecting the interests of minority groups and the NAACP Houston Branch in order to increase membership and volunteer recruitment, build coalitions around common goals, and increase Freedom Fund sponsorship of and attendance.

Meeting Chair: Juli McShay

Date & Time: First Monday of the Month, 4:30 p.m.

community@naacphouston.org

Criminal Justice Committee

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The Committee on Criminal Justice raises awareness about the inequities in the criminal and juvenile justice systems as well as some of the public misconceptions about the impact of recent “get tough” criminal policies on crime rate trends. Member work to increase minority participation in the Grand Jury system.

Chair: James Dixon, II

Meeting Date & Time: 1st Tuesday 6:30pm @ NAACP

justice@naacphouston.org

Economic Development Committee

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The Economic Development Committee implements local efforts and supports national programs that preserve and expand economic empowerment among minorities. The members promote business and home ownership, employment, and job creation.

Chair: Roger Harris

Meeting Date & Time: 2nd Monday 5:30pm @ NAACP

economics@naacphouston.org

Education Committee

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The Education Committee works to eliminate segregation and other discriminatory practices in public education. Members focus on educational conditions affecting minorities including dropout rates, school funding, attendance, parental involvement, standardized testing, and teacher certification.

Chair: Dr. Carolyn Evans -Shabazz

Meeting Date & Time: 1st Thursday 6:00pm @ NAACP

education@naacphouston.org

Environmental Climate Justice Committee

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The Environmental and Climate Justice Committee raises awareness of environmental issues, climate change and energy reform policies, and the linkages between environmental quality and social justice. The members are active in the Coalition for Environment, Equity, and Resilience (CEER), a collaborative made up of nonprofit organizations who have committed to working together to advance an 8 point plan.

Chair: Jacqueline Smith

Meeting Date & Time: Meeting times vary according to the Environmental Climate activity schedule.

climate@naacphouston.org

Freedom Fund Committee

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The Freedom Fund Committee (FFC) is the fundraising arm for the NAACP Houston Branch. The Annual Freedom Fund Advocacy and Awards Dinner (FFAAD) is the primary fundraiser for the branch. The FFAAD is traditionally held on the 4th Friday of October. Proceeds from the event support the branch operations and advocacy programming for the branch. The FFC also assists the unit with securing funds for special advocacy projects and the capital improvement fund for the branch headquarters.

Chair: Argentina M. James

Meeting Date & Time: Varies according to Freedom Fund activity schedule.

freedomfund@naacphouston.org

Health Committee

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The Health Committee is concerned with access to health care, health education, treatment and research, and sponsors health fairs and workshops highlighting important health issues for minorities.

Chair: Carol Moore

Meeting Date & Time: Varies according to Health activity schedule.

health@naacphouston.org



Housing Committee

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The Housing Committee studies housing conditions and new financing methods to promote home ownership. The members oppose all restrictive practices whether public or private, and refer complaints of housing discrimination.

Chair: Belinda Everette

Meeting Date & Time: 1st Wednesday 12:30 pm @ NAACP

housing@naacphouston.org

Labor & Industry Committee

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The Labor & Industry Committee works to eliminate discriminatory employment practices in industry and government, wage differentials based on race, unequal opportunities for training and promotion, discriminatory practices in labor unions, and unfair dismissals.

Chair: John Bland

Meeting Date & Time: 3rd Wednesday 6:00pm @ NAAC

labor@naacphouston.org

Legal Redress Committee

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The Legal Redress Committee on Legal Redress investigates all cases reported to the NAACP Houston Branch, supervise all litigation in which the Branch is involved, and keeps the National NAACP and Branch informed on the progress of every case.

Co-Chair: Mary King, Esq. & Charles Livingston, Esq.

Legal Clinics: 3rd Saturday of each month, 9am-2pm

legalredress@naacphouston.org

Membership & Life Membership Committee

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The Membership & Life Membership Committee works to increase membership by organizing campaigns, soliciting new members and renewals, and encouraging life memberships.

Chair: Mable Caleb

Meeting Date & Time: TBD 2nd Tuesday 5:30pm @ NAACP

membership@naacphouston.org

Political Action Committee

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The Political Action Committee focuses on voter registration and election turnout as well as legislation designed to improve the educational, political and economic status of minority groups. Members monitor proposed legislation and seeks the repeal of racially discriminatory laws. The Committee is non-partisan and does not endorse candidates for public office.

Chair: Claude Cummings Jr.

Meeting Date & Time: 2nd Monday 6:00pm @ NAACP

PAC-GOTV@naacphouston.org

Religious Affairs Committee

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The Religious Affairs Committee uses an educational program designed to give moral and ethical interpretation to the civil rights struggle and conveys this message to religious groups of all faiths. Members seek the support of religious groups for membership and fund raising.

Chair: Bishop Johnny Tates

Meeting Date & Time: TBD

religion@naacphouston.org

WIN (Women In the NAACP) Committee

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The WIN Committee supports social justice issues affecting women by serving as an advocacy vehicle for social, economic, political, educational and health and welfare issues affecting women.

Co-Chair: Sylvia Donahue- McCarter

Meeting Date & Time: 2nd Wednesday 6:30pm @ NAACP

WIN@naacphouston.org

Young Adult Committee

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The Young Adult Committee works with the Membership Committee to solicit memberships of individuals 21-40 years of age, and maintain a mentorship program that is a support bridge from youth and college to NAACP Houston Branch participation. Also provide networking and social opportunities for young adults.

Chair: Porschia Harris & Cha’Mira Keener

Meeting Date & Time: 1st Thursday 6:30pm @ NAACP

youngadult@naacphouston.org

Youth Works Committee

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The Youth Works Committee collaborates with the national NAACP to recognize exemplary youth, develop programs and activities consistent with the Association’s policies and mission for youth groups.

Chair: Avelina Holmes

Meeting Date & Time:Varies according to ACT-SO activity schedule

youthworks@naacphouston.org